the listening examples

Of all the listenin” rel=”nofollow”>ing examples (marked Listenin” rel=”nofollow”>ing Cues) presented in” rel=”nofollow”>in Module 1, pick just two to comment on. Listen to them again” rel=”nofollow”>in, and for each write a short paragraph of your reactions. Be sure to tell me which two examples you are discussin” rel=”nofollow”>ing in” rel=”nofollow”>in your reaction paragraphs and the chapter where you found them!
2. Three or four complete sentences are enough for each example if you provide sufficient in” rel=”nofollow”>information. (That would make 6 – 8 sentences total, divided in” rel=”nofollow”>into two paragraphs.)
3. Include the name of the work you are citin” rel=”nofollow”>ing, and the name of the composer and lyricist (if any), as well as the chapter or movement from which the piece comes. (For example, you might either mention a piece

Chapter 1 Student Tasks:
1 Read Chapter 1, The English-Celtic Tradition, pp. 4 – 15. As you go, pay special attention to the terms that will help you understand conventions of English-Celtic folksong and get you started in” rel=”nofollow”>in your journey through American Music History. The important terms are repeated at the end of every chapter, so there is no need to write them down, unless that helps you remember them.
▪ The chapter will likely take you no more than a half hour to read (plus time to listen to the musical examples), but if English is not your first language or if you read slowly your time may be longer. This is only to give you a general idea, so please adjust my rough estimates to your own learnin” rel=”nofollow”>ing style. This onlin” rel=”nofollow”>ine course grants you considerable freedom in” rel=”nofollow”>in plannin” rel=”nofollow”>ing your own schedule. All you have to worry about as far as deadlin” rel=”nofollow”>ines go is the day and time the module closes – after that, no work can be accepted.

Listen: As you go, listen to the 5 musical examples embedded in” rel=”nofollow”>in chapter 1, called Listenin” rel=”nofollow”>ing Cue 1 – 5. Remember, you just downloaded them! They are short – the longest is less than three min” rel=”nofollow”>inutes, the shortest only a min” rel=”nofollow”>inute. Your text for each Listenin” rel=”nofollow”>ing Cue gives basic in” rel=”nofollow”>information about the recordin” rel=”nofollow”>ing and thin” rel=”nofollow”>ings to listen for, but usually the first time through you may wish just to go for a general impression. You may recognize one or more of these. They’ll give you a better idea of early American folk music than any amount of readin” rel=”nofollow”>ing could give!

Chapter 2 Student Tasks:
2 Read Chapter 2, The African American Tradition, pp. 16 – 26. As you go, pay special attention to the terms and concepts that will likely be new to you. The important new terms are repeated at the end of each chapter. It should take you less than a half hour, plus time to listen to the musical examples.
3
Listen: As you go, listen to the 5 musical examples embedded in” rel=”nofollow”>in chapter 2, called Listenin” rel=”nofollow”>ing Cue 6 – 10. Again” rel=”nofollow”>in, they are short – the longest is less than three min” rel=”nofollow”>inutes, the shortest only a min” rel=”nofollow”>inute.

Chapter 4 Student Tasks:
4 Read Chapter 4, Latin” rel=”nofollow”>ino Traditions, pp. 36 – 53. As you go, pay special attention to the terms and concepts that will likely be new to you. The important new terms are repeated at the end of each chapter.
5
Listen: As you go, listen to the 6 musical examples embedded in” rel=”nofollow”>in chapter 4, called Listenin” rel=”nofollow”>ing Cue 16 – 21. Again” rel=”nofollow”>in, they are short – the longest is less than three min” rel=”nofollow”>inutes, the shortest only a min” rel=”nofollow”>inute.

Required Text:
American Music, a Panorama. Concise 5thEd. Lorenzo Candelaria, Coursesmart.com, 2013.

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