Interventions of social anxiety disorder

Interventions of social anxiety disorder

Order Description
Quanitative Research Paper
Use of google scholar
15 pages to in” rel=”nofollow”>include
• Title page
• Abstract
• Introduction
• Literature reviews used (2)
• Methods
• Participants
• Materials and settin” rel=”nofollow”>ing
• Procedure
• Discussion
• Conclusion
• Reference page
1. Paper should in” rel=”nofollow”>include the different in” rel=”nofollow”>interventions affect the behavior of young adults with social anxiety disorder. Question to be asked is “which technique is more
effective, exposure in” rel=”nofollow”>interventions or cognitive behavior therapy”?
2. Hypothosize the results of the study
3. Include a table of data (within” rel=”nofollow”>in the 15 pages)
4. Describe how the data researched in” rel=”nofollow”>integrates with the in” rel=”nofollow”>information that is from the literature reviews used.
5. APA format

Below are the 2 sources for the literature reviews to be used.

A case for in” rel=”nofollow”>integratin” rel=”nofollow”>ing values clarification work in” rel=”nofollow”>into cognitive behavioral therapy for socialanxiety disorder.
Authors:
Grumet, Robin” rel=”nofollow”>in. Department of Educational and Counsellin” rel=”nofollow”>ing Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, PQ, Canada, robin” rel=”nofollow”>in.grumet@mail.mcgill.ca
Fitzpatrick, Marilyn. Department of Educational and Counsellin” rel=”nofollow”>ing Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, PQ, Canada
Address:
Grumet, Robin” rel=”nofollow”>in, Department of Educational and Counsellin” rel=”nofollow”>ing Psychology, McGill University, 3700 McTavish Street, Montreal, PQ, Canada, H3A 1Y2,
robin” rel=”nofollow”>in.grumet@mail.mcgill.ca
Source:
Journal of Psychotherapy Integration, Vol 26(1), Mar, 2016. Existentialism and Humanism in” rel=”nofollow”>in Psychotherapy Integration. pp. 11-21.
Publisher:
:
cognitive behavioral therapy, social anxiety disorder, acceptance and commitment therapy, values clarification

Virtual reality exposure therapy for social anxiety disorder: A randomized controlled trial.
Source:
Journal of Consultin” rel=”nofollow”>ing and Clin” rel=”nofollow”>inical Psychology, Vol 81(5), Oct, 2013. pp. 751-760.
Publisher:
US : American Psychological Association
Other Journal Titles:
Authors:
Anderson, Page L.. Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, US, panderson@gsu.edu
Price, Matthew. Department of Psychology, University of Vermont, Burlin” rel=”nofollow”>ington, VT, US
Edwards, Shannan M.. Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, US
Obasaju, Mayowa A.. Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, US
Schmertz, Stefan K.. Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, US
Zimand, Elana. Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, US
Calamaras, Martha R.. Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, US

Journal of Consultin” rel=”nofollow”>ing Psychology
cognitive behavioral therapy, social anxiety disorder, social phobia, virtual reality exposure therapy

Objective: This is the first randomized trial comparin” rel=”nofollow”>ing virtual reality exposure therapy to in” rel=”nofollow”>in vivo exposure for social anxietydisorder. Method: Participants with a
prin” rel=”nofollow”>incipal diagnosis of social anxiety disorder who identified public speakin” rel=”nofollow”>ing as their primary fear (N = 97) were recruited from the community, resultin” rel=”nofollow”>ing in” rel=”nofollow”>in an
ethnically diverse sample (M age = 39 years) of mostly women (62%). Participants were randomly assigned to and completed 8 sessions of manualized virtual reality
exposuretherapy, exposure group therapy, or wait list. Standardized self-report measures were collected at pretreatment, posttreatment, and 12-month follow-up, and
process measures were collected durin” rel=”nofollow”>ing treatment. A standardized speech task was delivered at pre- and posttreatment, and diagnostic status was reassessed at 3-month
follow-up. Results: Analysis of covariance showed that, relative to wait list, people completin” rel=”nofollow”>ing either active treatment significantly improved on all but one measure
(length of speech for exposure group therapy and self-reported fear of negative evaluation for virtual reality exposure therapy). At 12-month follow-up, people showed
significant improvement from pretreatment on all measures. There were no differences between the active treatments on any process or outcome measure at any time, nor
differences on achievin” rel=”nofollow”>ing partial or full remission. Conclusion: Virtual reality exposure therapy is effective for treatin” rel=”nofollow”>ing social fears, and improvement is main” rel=”nofollow”>intain” rel=”nofollow”>ined
for 1 year. Virtual reality exposure therapy is equally effective as exposure group therapy; further research with a larger sample is needed, however, to better
control and statistically test differences between the treatments. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved)

Document Type:Subjects:
*Cognitive Behavior Therapy; *Exposure Therapy; *Social Phobia; *Virtual Reality; Social Anxiety

find the cost of your paper