Study on immigrant therapists

Order Description

Briefly reiterate the research problem or problems you are in” rel=”nofollow”>investigatin” rel=”nofollow”>ing and the methods you used to in” rel=”nofollow”>investigate them, describe the major fin” rel=”nofollow”>indin” rel=”nofollow”>ings of the study. write a direct, declarative, and succin” rel=”nofollow”>inct proclamation of the study results, usually in” rel=”nofollow”>in one paragraph.

II. Explain” rel=”nofollow”>in the Meanin” rel=”nofollow”>ing of the Fin” rel=”nofollow”>indin” rel=”nofollow”>ings and Why They are Important

Consider the likelihood that no one has thought as long and hard about your study as you have. Systematically explain” rel=”nofollow”>in the underlyin” rel=”nofollow”>ing meanin” rel=”nofollow”>ing of your fin” rel=”nofollow”>indin” rel=”nofollow”>ings and state why you believe they are significant. After readin” rel=”nofollow”>ing the discussion section, you want the reader to thin” rel=”nofollow”>ink critically about the results [“why didn’t I thin” rel=”nofollow”>ink of that?”]. You don’t want to force the reader to go through the paper multiple times to figure out what it all means. If applicable, begin” rel=”nofollow”>in this part of the section by repeatin” rel=”nofollow”>ing what you consider to be your most significant or unanticipated fin” rel=”nofollow”>indin” rel=”nofollow”>ing first, then systematically review each fin” rel=”nofollow”>indin” rel=”nofollow”>ing. Otherwise, follow the general order you reported the fin” rel=”nofollow”>indin” rel=”nofollow”>ings in” rel=”nofollow”>in the results section.

III. Relate the Fin” rel=”nofollow”>indin” rel=”nofollow”>ings to Similar Studies

No study in” rel=”nofollow”>in the social sciences is so novel or possesses such a restricted focus that it has absolutely no relation to previously published research. The discussion section should relate your results to those found in” rel=”nofollow”>in other studies, particularly if questions raised from prior studies served as the motivation for your research. This is important because comparin” rel=”nofollow”>ing and contrastin” rel=”nofollow”>ing the fin” rel=”nofollow”>indin” rel=”nofollow”>ings of other studies helps to support the overall importance of your results and it highlights how and in” rel=”nofollow”>in what ways your study differs from other research about the topic. Note that any significant or unanticipated fin” rel=”nofollow”>indin” rel=”nofollow”>ing is often because there was no prior research to in” rel=”nofollow”>indicate the fin” rel=”nofollow”>indin” rel=”nofollow”>ing could occur. If there is prior research to in” rel=”nofollow”>indicate this, you need to explain” rel=”nofollow”>in why it was significant or unanticipated.

IV. Consider Alternative Explanations of the Fin” rel=”nofollow”>indin” rel=”nofollow”>ings

It is important to remember that the purpose of research in” rel=”nofollow”>in the social sciences is to discover and not to prove. When writin” rel=”nofollow”>ing the discussion section, you should carefully consider all possible explanations for the study results, rather than just those that fit your hypothesis or prior assumptions and biases. This is especially important when describin” rel=”nofollow”>ing the discovery of significant or unanticipated fin” rel=”nofollow”>indin” rel=”nofollow”>ings.

V. Acknowledge the Study’s Limitations

It is far better for you to identify and acknowledge your study’s limitations than to have them poin” rel=”nofollow”>inted out by your professor! Note any unanswered questions or issues your study did not address and describe the generalizability of your results to other situations. If a limitation is applicable to the method chosen to gather in” rel=”nofollow”>information, then describe in” rel=”nofollow”>in detail the problems you encountered and why.

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