Queer Cinema

This essay is about the 1996 film, Bound 1] Ellis Hanson asserts that Bound critically engages in “the queer appropriation of popular visual and narrative styles.” Assess this claim through a discussion of what queer appropriation is and, through the critical analysis of moments in the film, how the film engages in this process. Also, all sources must by scholarly Thanks so much

Instructions: Choose one essay prompt from the list below.

Essay Prompts

1] Ellis Hanson asserts that Bound critically engages in “the queer appropriation of popular visual and narrative styles.” Assess this claim through a discussion of what queer appropriation is and, through the critical analysis of moments in the film, how the film engages in this process.

2] Through a comparative analysis of Different from the Others and Madchen in Uniform discuss the models of gender and sexuality represented in each of these films. How does each film draw on the perspectives advanced by the early German homosexual emancipation movement? Critically assess which film you think makes a stronger or more persuasive case for the rights of same-sex desiring people and why.

3] Discuss how the use of camp can be understood as way of critiquing norms of gender and sexuality and show how this operates in film through an analysis of any 1-2 of the following films: Bound, I’m No Angel, Pink Narcissus, The Living End.

4] Tanfer Emin-Tunc argues that Glen or Glenda is “an attempt by Wood, who himself was a female transvestite, to normalize an otherwise “deviant” form of gender expression by portraying it as, ideally, a guilt free expression of male heterosexuality.” (113) Through close analysis of the film, critically examine this assertion (make certain not to simply replicate Emin-Tunc’s analysis but to expand upon it or argue against it).

5] Looking at any 1-3 postwar underground films screened on the course, analyze how it/they work to “counter” Hollywood imagery a queer way.

6] Looking closely at 1-3 of her films, analyze how the work of Barbara Hammer uses film form to present ways of looking at female-female desire rarely available in more popular kinds of film (Hollywood, mainstream pornography, etc).

7] Explore how the films of Pat Rocco worked as a form of gay culture-making, both in terms of the content of the films themselves and through the film events and programs at which they screened.

8] Analyze how any 2-3 films screened during the week “Liberation Cinema” can be understood as rhetorical works that express the goals and values of the gay liberation movement of late 1960s and early 1970s.

9] Thomas Waugh argues that “performative documentary attempts to reorient us – affectively, subjectively—toward the historic, poetic world it brings into being.” (252) Examine this claim through an analysis of Word is Out.

10] Thomas Waugh argues that ‘lesbian and gay “performance documentaries” of the seventies—and earlier […]—must be reclaimed not only as the key to our past but the key to the present.’ (268). Critically assess this statement and, through an analysis of any documentary material screened on the course, explore what value this material may have for present day audiences.

11] Analyze how Fast Trip, Long Drop works as piece of AIDS activist media? How does it differ from and work to counter the effects of mainstream representations of HIV and AIDS in the 1990s?

12] B Ruby Rich argues that genre revision and pastiche are central to the films of New Queer cinema. Through a critical analysis of The Living End, explore how the film incorporates and/or references specific genres as a means of queer storytelling.

13] Steven Funk and Jaydi Funk argue that season one of Transparent largely ignores “transgender experience” focusing instead on a cissexist view of trans life. (71) Undertake a close analysis of the any 2-3 sequences as a means of assessing this claim (you might find that certain sequences either support this claim, complicate it, or even work against it).

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