immigration in California history

 

Each student must find a minimum of FIVE academic sources (articles or chapters from monographs) on a more or less specific aspect of immigration in California history. These sources must be authoritative: this means that they must be written by academic experts (Phd’s and professors) in the field of California history or immigration history; and each of the sources (articles or chapters from monographs) must pertain specifically to the topic of immigration in California history. Please note: you cannot use websites; though you can certainly use internet facsimiles (digital reproductions) of academic journals or monographs. There is a very distinct difference here. One rule of thumb is, if the source does not have page numbers, it is not valid.

In any case, these FIVE sources (minimum) must each come from at least FIVE different decades. For instance, you could find one article or book chapter written in the 1950s, another in the 1970s, another in the 1980s, 1990s, or 2010s: as long as there are FIVE in total, from FIVE different decades—though the decades do not have to be sequential. For instance, one could be from the 1940s, another from the 1960s, another from the 1980s, another from the 1990s, another from the 2100s.

Your job is to read and analyze these sources, and determine and discuss some overarching trend found therein (this will be your thesis statement): how do these historians’ assessments or analyses of the topic (or some specific aspect of the larger topic) change or remain the same over the decades and why? In essence, you are doing a history of the academic history of the specified topic. There are no “primary” sources involved, as far as you are concerned: you are analyzing the work of “modern experts” on the chosen topic to determine if, how, and why historians’ own interpretations of the topic have changed over the years. Do not overthink this: you are doing an analytical “history of the history.” There is no “right” answer.

Each student is required to submit a “historiographical essay” (minimum of EIGHT typed—or computer-generated—pages) on the subject of the history of immigration in California (for the due date, see the Course Schedule at the bottom of your syllabus).

Grades will be weighted among the following categories:

1.) Overall structure and presentation, including formatting (which includes a proper cover page).
2.) Grammar, including spelling.
3.) Quality of sources and use of direct evidence.
4.) Force and clarity of argument and analytical reasoning,

The text of the essay must be no less than EIGHT full pages; this does not include an additional cover page that must also be submitted with the essay. The text (i.e., excluding the cover page) must be double-spaced, in twelve-point font, Times New Roman font, with one-inch margins. If you do not follow these guidelines you will be penalized a full letter grade for each type of infraction.

THE ASSIGNMENT:
Each student must find a minimum of FIVE academic sources (articles or chapters from monographs) on a more or less specific aspect of immigration in California history. These sources must be authoritative: this means that they must be written by academic experts (Phd’s and professors) in the field of California history or immigration history; and each of the sources (articles or chapters from monographs) must pertain specifically to the topic of immigration in California history. Please note: you cannot use websites; though you can certainly use internet facsimiles (digital reproductions) of academic journals or monographs. There is a very distinct difference here. One rule of thumb is, if the source does not have page numbers, it is not valid.

In any case, these FIVE sources (minimum) must each come from at least FIVE different decades. For instance, you could find one article or book chapter written in the 1950s, another in the 1970s, another in the 1980s, 1990s, or 2010s: as long as there are FIVE in total, from FIVE different decades—though the decades do not have to be sequential. For instance, one could be from the 1940s, another from the 1960s, another from the 1980s, another from the 1990s, another from the 2100s.

Your job is to read and analyze these sources, and determine and discuss some overarching trend found therein (this will be your thesis statement): how do these historians’ assessments or analyses of the topic (or some specific aspect of the larger topic) change or remain the same over the decades and why? In essence, you are doing a history of the academic history of the specified topic. There are no “primary” sources involved, as far as you are concerned: you are analyzing the work of “modern experts” on the chosen topic to determine if, how, and why historians’ own interpretations of the topic have changed over the years. Do not overthink this: you are doing an analytical “history of the history.” There is no “right” answer.

GENERAL RULES & REQUIREMENTS:
Each essay must have a cover page—though this should not be considered as counting towards the requisite page minimum. This must begin with the following title: HISTORIOGRAPHICAL ESSAY: CHOOSE YOUR OWN TOPIC NAME OR DESCRIPTION. This title should appear twelve single line spaces (twelve-point font spaces) down from the top margin, centered, in Times New Roman font, all caps, with the text itself in twenty-point font, boldface, and italicized—but not underlined. This should be followed, two single line spaces down, by the course and section number; which should be followed by the student’s name (two single line spaces down); which should finally be followed by the date (two single line spaces down). Each of these (course, name, and date) should be in fourteen-point font and all caps, but not in boldface, italics, or underlined. Finally, all text on the cover page should be centered. See example.

The first paragraph of the actual essay (the actual text) should be an extra six double-line spaces (twelve single-line spaces) down from the top margin. Each question must be numbered. See example.

Please understand, this is an academic exercise in historical analysis. This is not an editorial exercise. In general, an academic paper or essay (but especially one of this sort) should be void of any type of moralizing, or subjective or emotion-based opinion, including categories of moral “rightness” or “wrongness”—“good” or “bad.” Objective argumentation and analysis is what you are after—well-reasoned and well-evidenced. In other words, it should not be a question of what you “think” or “feel,” but what (objective) logic, reasoning, and evidence can show. It is critical that you understand the difference.

CITATIONS:
The footnote function in Word is quite user-friendly, once you get the hang of it. If you do not use Word already, Microsoft Office is available free to all students: just Google “microsoft office free student.” The instructions are quite simple: all you need is your student email address to download the software (and keep) for free.

The first time you cite a work in your footnotes use this format:

J. Doe, Immigration in California History (New York, 1994), p. 214.

J. Doe, “Aspects of Immigration in California History,” The Journal of History 19 (1976), pp. 109-29, at p. 116.

Each additional time you cite the work, follow accordingly:

Doe, Immigration in California History, p. 336.

Doe, “Aspects of Immigration,” p. 121.

Sample Solution

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