Business Ethics

Marian, a top graduate from Loyola in Humanities, was hired by a major corporation into a management position. Marian finished the corporation’s management training program top in her group, and is performing above the norm in her position. She is really enjoying her work.
As a black woman she feels isolated, as there are no other black women managers and few women in her area. One night at a company party she heard a conversation between two of her male co-workers and their supervisor. They were complaining to him about Marian’s lack of qualifications and her unpleasant personality. They cursed affirmative action regulations for making the hiring of Marian necessary.
Marian is very upset and wants to quit.
Questions:
Should Marian quit?
Are her co-workers correct in their evaluation?
Should Marian confront the co-workers?
Should Marian file a discrimination suit?
Should Marian go to the supervisor?
What else could Marian do?

Case Study 2: Employee Absence

Joan, an employee of Great American Market, was warned about her excessive absenteeism several times, both verbally and in writing. The written warning included notice that “further violations will result in disciplinary actions,” including suspension or discharge.
A short time after the written warning was issued, Joan called work to say she was not going to be in because her babysitter had called in sick and she had to stay home and care for her young child. Joan’s supervisor, Sylvia, told her that she had already exceeded the allowed number of absences and warned that if she did not report to work, she could be suspended. When Joan did not report for her shift, Sylvia suspended her for fifteen days.

In a subsequent hearing, Joan argued that it was not her fault that the babysitter had canceled, and protested that she had no other choice but to stay home. Sylvia pointed out that Joan had not made a good faith effort to find an alternate babysitter, nor had she tried to swap shifts with a co-worker. Furthermore, Sylvia said that the lack of a babysitter was not a justifiable excuse for being absent.
Questions:
Was the suspension fair?
Did Sylvia act responsibly?
Should Joan be fired?
Should the babysitter be fired?
Was Sylvia fair in her actions?
Is there ever a solution for working mothers?
Should working fathers take turns staying home?

 

 

 

Sample Solution

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