How was the American Revolution a Civil War That Turned Neighbors into Enemies?

How was the American Revolution a Civil War That Turned Neighbors into Enemies?
Before becoming a war against the British, the American war for independence was a civil war, a street-level conflict that pitted neighbor against neighbor.
Objective: This is an exercise that not only employs the analytical skills critical to the study of history but it also requires students to understand how individuals experienced major events in U.S. history. You will read and analyze a primary source document and then answer the questions below.
I. For this assignment students will read The American Revolution as Civil War, created by America in Class from the National Humanities Center. It can be found online at http://americainclass.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/AmRevCivilWar-StudentVersion.pdf and it is also attached.
The close reading questions that appear on the handout will help students to analyze the document.

  1. Answer the following questions, in sentence/paragraph format. Upload your answers to the Assignment link. Grading: This will be graded using the Assignment Rubric. This is an optional assignment; the grade will replace a lower assignment/discussion grade. Question 1: From the perspective of a Patriot, retell the groom incident. Be precise. Schaw describes him as a “poor English groom” [caretaker of horses]. How would a Patriot describe him? Schaw says he °smiled at” the regiment. How would a Patriot describe his behavior? Schaw was horrified at his treatment. How would a Patriot have felt? Justify the original intended punishment of tarring and feathering. Describe why you and your comrades decided on the alternative punishment. Describe and justify it. Question 2: Describe the second incident from the point of view of the officer in charge of the prisoners. Again, be precise. Shaw describes the Loyalists as “much impassioned.” How would the officer describe them? Remember, the officer had dinner with Shaw just recently. In light of that, how might he respond to her questions? Justify holding the Loyalists in the street. Imagine how you felt when one of the Loyalists challenged your authority to hold them. Describe why you let them go. Question 3: Have these passages changed your image of the American Revolution and the pees^ it rid if en
    how?

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