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Essay Analysis

Description of task

This task is designed to allow you to show your strength as a creative writer.

With a particular audience and purpose in mind, compose your most impressive piece of vignette writing. Make sure you employ the traditional features of the vignette text type to demonstrate your understanding of the genre, and to achieve your purpose.

Assessment conditions

A vignette of up to 1000 words Refer to rubric for requirements.

Performance Standards – Vignette

Knowledge and Understanding Analysis Application
A Detailed knowledge and understanding of ways in which ideas, perspectives, and values are represented in texts.
Thorough knowledge and understanding of a range of ways in which authors use stylistic features to communicate ideas.
Detailed knowledge and understanding of a range of stylistic features and conventions of different text types. Perceptive analysis of the ways in which texts represent ideas, perspectives, and values.
Perceptive analysis and evaluation of the complex ways in which stylistic features are used to influence the interpretation of texts.
Perceptive analysis of similarities and differences between texts in comparative tasks.
Perceptive analysis of ways in which different critical perspectives inform critical interpretation. Sophisticated use of a wide range of conventions, and/or stylistic features to create coherent texts that address the meaning and intention of the task.
Detailed and appropriate use of evidence from texts develop, support, and justify responses, with textual references incorporated fluently in discussion.
Use of precise and fluent expression, which is appropriate for audience and purpose.
B Knowledge and understanding of a range of ways in which ideas, perspectives, and values are represented in most texts.
Knowledge and understanding of a range of ways in which authors use stylistic features to communicate ideas.
Knowledge and understanding of a range of stylistic features and conventions of different text types. Clear analysis of the ways in which texts represent ideas, perspectives, and values.
Clear analysis and evaluation of the complex ways in which stylistic features are used to influence the reading of texts.
Clear analysis of similarities and differences between texts in comparative tasks.
Clear analysis of ways in which different critical perspectives inform critical interpretation. Use of a range of conventions, and/or stylistic features to create coherent texts that address the meaning and intention of the task.
Appropriate use of evidence from texts to develop, support, and justify responses, with textual references incorporated in discussion.
Mostly accurate and fluent expression, which is appropriate for audience and purpose.
C Knowledge and understanding of some ways in which ideas, perspectives, and values are represented in texts.
Knowledge and understanding of some ways in which authors use stylistic features to communicate ideas.
Knowledge and understanding of some of the stylistic features and conventions of different text types. Some analysis of ways in which texts represent ideas, perspectives, and values.
Description, with some analysis and evaluation, of ways in which stylistic features are used to influence the reading of texts.
Description, with some analysis, of similarities and differences between texts in comparative tasks.
Some analysis of ways in which different critical perspectives inform critical interpretation. Competent use of conventions, and/or stylistic features to create texts that address the meaning and intention of the task.
Competent use of evidence from texts to develop, support, and justify responses, with some use of textual references in discussion.
Generally fluent and clear expression, which is mostly appropriate for audience and purpose.
D Some knowledge and restricted understanding of a narrow range of ways in which ideas and values are represented in texts.
Some knowledge and restricted understanding of a narrow range of ways in which authors use stylistic features to communicate ideas.
Some knowledge and restricted understanding of a few of the stylistic features and conventions of different text types. Description of the ideas and values represented in texts.
Description of some ways in which stylistic features are used to influence the reading of texts.
Some description of similarities and differences between texts in comparative tasks.
Recognition of some ways in which different critical perspectives inform critical interpretation. Use of some language features to create texts that address the meaning and intention of the task in a limited way.
Some use of evidence from texts to develop, support and attempt to justify responses, with use of a narrow range of textual references.
Occasionally clear expression, which is appropriate for some audiences and purposes.
E Simplistic knowledge and very restricted understanding of the way in which an idea or a value is represented in a text.
Limited knowledge and restricted understanding of a restricted range of stylistic features used by authors.
Limited knowledge and restricted understanding of different text types and conventions. Reference to an idea or value represented in a text.
Limited description of a way in which a stylistic feature is used to influence the reading of a text.
Simplistic description of a connection between texts in a comparative task.
Reference to a critical perspective. Attempted use of some language features to create texts that attempt to address the meaning and intention of the task in a limited way.
Restricted use of evidence from texts to develop and support a simple response, with minimal textual references.
Emerging development of control of expression.

Sample Solution

proved. (Mill 2006: 259) His justification for colonialism in “Considerations” is therefore a great contradiction to his commitment to individual liberty. This suggests that his view that colonialism led to more individual liberty for the people was an idea rather than a definitive policy. (Isak 2007: 359-400). Mill’s justification that colonialism will nurture the people to adopt the principle of individual liberty also contradicts all his arguments for non-intervention in the case of a civilised nation; that liberty must be gained through an arduous struggle and that aid by a foreign power to obtain liberty has negative long term affects. Firstly, it could be argued that if an arduous struggle is the only way people can gain liberty, then how are the British going to artificially prepare the people for liberty? Secondly, there were examples of arduous struggles against British rule in India and yet Mill still supported British control over these people. For example, the Sepoy Mutiny in India in 1857-59 involved the majority of the population. (Ryan 2014: 1-14) To add to this great contradiction, the same year (1859) as the mutiny Mill even wrote in “A Few Words on Non-Intervention” about how people must be given self-rule if they fight for it. (Mill 2006: 262) Although Mill may argue that these “barbarians” are not yet civilised enough to know that they want this freedom, Hamburger questions how Mill is to judge who is ready to decide their own governance through individual liberty? (Hamburger 1999 in Tunick 2006: 601). A further contradiction is Mill’s belief that it is unfair for a foreign power to prevent the people from overthrowing it and he even believes foreign oppression would warrant an invasion from another foreign power to correct the imbalance and create a fair struggle. (Mill 2006: 262) Tunick has tried to argue that there was greater corruption in India prior to British rule hence at least the British gave the people a chance of gaining liberty which they would not have had. (Tunick 2006: 601) However, this argument actually contradicts Mills belief that foreign intervention in this situation was unhealthy, as the State could easily become reliant on foreign support and this could lead to another civil war or oppressive government when the foreign power leaves. Hence, if foreign control could lead to this situation, this clearly would not give the people more liberty and this undermines Mills argument that the local people of India will one day have been pedagogically coerced enough to be able to take over from British rule. Furthermore, through imposing British ideas of individual liberty on these “uncivilised” communities he is being narrow minded in assuming he knows what is best for these countries and is in fact taking away the liberty of these people to decide how they interact. This is because his arguments are based on a fundamental misunderstanding of the culture of Asia and Africa, which put a greater emphasis on social obligation. (Doyle 2009: 365) What’s more, through Mill’s assumption that he can educate the Indians to want self-rule and individual liberty he is contradicting his own idea that the demand for change must come from within the country. Based on this argument surely the colonisers should have suggested the idea of individual liberty, instead of imposing it, so that the people were more likely to fight to maintain this liberty as they had chosen it themselves. Mill’s response to this would be that they are not yet capable of deciding this for themselves, but it could equally be argued that slaves can only learn to be free when they are given freedom.
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