No More Worries!

image Our orders are delivered strictly on time without delay

Paper Formatting

  • Double or single-spaced
  • 1-inch margin
  • 12 Font Arial or Times New Roman
  • 300 words per page

No Lateness!

image Our orders are delivered strictly on time without delay

Our Guarantees

image

  • Free Unlimited revisions
  • Guaranteed Privacy
  • Money Return guarantee
  • Plagiarism Free Writing

Play Therapy in Action

S​‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‌‍‌‌‍‍‍‌‍‌‌‌‍​ocial workers are trained to “start where the client is.” You have a responsibility to use language and interventions that are respectful of your client’s developmental and emotional level. But what if your client is a child? How can you start from the child’s point of reference? In this Assignment, you identify the play therapy strategies evident in the case of Elle (found in your Learning Resources). You also engage in self-reflection and discuss your level of comfort with providing play therapy. Review the “Case of Elle” from this week’s Learning Resources. By Day 7 Submit a 2- to 3-page paper addressing the following: Briefly summarize the key aspects of the case. Identify the direct and indirect play therapy strategies employed and explain how they differ. Discuss why you would or why you would not be comfortable providing play therapy—consider both direct and indirect approaches. Working With Children and Families: The Case of Elle I received a referral for a 6-year-old Puerto Rican female named Elle. The referral came from a local pediatrician. Elle was referred because the pediatrician noted that Elle was showing symptoms of depression, including weight loss, disinterest in typical activities, and general lethargy. The parents, Mark (age 37) and Pamela (age 34), reported no recent changes in the home situation and had no explanation for Elle’s behavioral and emotional changes. As part of the initial assessment, I met with Elle’s parents. I asked about the current situation at home, their relationship, and changes that may have occurred recently. None were identified. As part of my assessment, I questioned each parent about the work that they did, their schedules, and any recent work changes. Elle’s father reported no significant changes; her mother noted her return tosecond-shift work. In my first meeting with Elle, I explained my role as a person who helped children with things that bothered them. I introduced Elle to our sand tray and invited her to “play” as we talked. Over the next two weeks, Elle built a sand castle and told me that a small child lived in one of the rooms. She circled the room​‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‌‍‌‌‍‍‍‌‍‌‌‌‍​ again and again with a soldier on a white horse. When I asked what the soldier was doing, she simply shrugged her shoulders and continued to circle the castle. During our time together, as Elle began to use the soldier on horseback to circle the child, I asked her to show me how the soldier might help the child that lived in the castle. She showed the soldier riding away. I asked how the soldier riding away helped the child. At that point, Elle shut down and went to play with other toys in the play © 2019 Laureate Education, Inc. 1 therapy room. I did not intervene. Elle spent the rest of the time playing with a zoo, telling me that the bear was missing. In the sixth session, I asked Elle about the child in the castle. “Is the child safe?” I asked. “No way!” Elle exclaimed. I asked her to show me how to help the child. After several stops and starts, Elle brought a brown horse with a female rider. The rider said, “Climb on, I will take you away.” The child climbed on, and the horse took them to the other end of the playroom. When I asked Elle to tell me what the child said to the rider on the brown horse as they were riding away, she said, “It’s a secret.” I told Elle that when children tell hard secrets, my job was to work hard to keep children safe. With eyes wide-open, Elle asked if I could keep the child from the castle safe. © 2019 Laureate Education, Inc. 2 Webb, N. B. (2019). Social work practice with children (4th ed.). New York, NY: The Guilford Press. Chapter 7, “Individual Play Therapy” Brezinka, V. (2014). Computer games supporting cognitive behaviour therapy in children. Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 19(1), 100–110. doi: 10.1177/1359104512468288 Davis, E. S., & Pereira, J. K. (2014). Child-centered play therapy: A creative approach to culturally competent counseling. Journal of Creativity in Mental Health, 9(2), 262–274. doi:10.1080/15401383.2014.892863 Taylor, D. D., & Bratton, S. C. (2014). Developmentally appropriate practice: Adlerian play therapy with preschool children. The Journal of Individual Psychology, 70(3​‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‌‍‌‌‍‍‍‌‍‌‌‌‍​), 205–219.

Sample Solution

ed Maasai to become engaged in farming. This helps him to diversified their economy and avoid drought risks. According to Cambell (2005, p. 776), “Herding was being replaced by mixed livestock-cropping enterprises, and the better-watered margins of the rangelands was extensively cultivated. The main aim of Maasai’s people was to get well-watered land on the group ranches which were used herding and then agricultural activities: “The major incentive for acceptance of the concept of group ranches was that the Maasai saw in the legal title a means of maintaining their rights granted” (Campbell, 1986, p.47). However, the opportunity to get land in this area adapted to agriculture led to the increase in the number of immigrants. The population’s growth resulted in the problem of water and soil resource availability. Also the problem of land degradation has arisen. According to Kimani and Pickari (1998) the majority of farmers couldn’t afford fertilizes to improve the situation. “Soil fertility decline, increased soil erosion, and deforestation were widely reported in 1996” (Campbell, 1999, p.394). In the Loitokitok area farming began in the 1930s with the establishment of a District Office. The administration employed staff who came from farming areas elsewhere in Kenya, and who began to cultivate. In the Loitokitok area it reflects natural increase as well as migration of large numbers from the congested central highlands of Kenya to farm the slopes of Mt. Kilimanjaro and other hills. As for wildlife managers, among their main aims Campbell (2000) states nature diversity conservation – improving disrupted wildlife movements, access to water in riparian zones, and altered livestock grazing patterns. Another aspect, connected also with wildlife tourism enterprises, might be improving tourism facilities. Moreover, for a better management of various land use stakeholders of the region, there is an aim of wildlife managers to develop and implement strategies that might encourage people living near wildlife parks to accept the costs, and benefits, coming from the parks and the wildlife (Campbell, 2005). Basically, therefore among their activities we can mention return
PLACE AN ORDER NOW

Price Calculator

Subject:
Type:
Pages/Words:
Single spaced
approx 275 words per page
Urgency:
Level:
Currency:
Total Cost:

12% Discount

image

  • Research Paper Writing
  • Essay Writing
  • Dissertation Writing
  • Thesis Writing

Why Choose Us

image

  • Money Return guarantee
  • Guaranteed Privacy
  • Written by Professionals
  • Paper Written from Scratch
  • Timely Deliveries
  • Free Amendments