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Poetry Analysis

This poem is intended as a springboard for an intertextual connection between it and the novel, Girl in
Translation by Jean Kwok. When we make an intertextual connection, we are looking at the varied ways that
we make meaning between texts and develop our critical thinking about the information as it relates to our self,
relates to other texts and relates to the world. Thus, re-read the poem by Chang, then answer the questions
which follows.
Saying Yes
by Diana Chang
“Are you Chinese?”
“Yes.”
“American?”
“Yes.”
“Really Chinese?”
“No . . . not quite.”
“Really American?”
“Well, actually, you see . . .”
But I would rather say
yes
Not neither-nor,
not maybe,
but both, and not only
The homes I’ve had,
the ways I am
I’d rather say it
twice,
yes
Questions for you:
What personal thoughts and/or connections does the text raise for you, particularly your feelings regarding your
family heritage? Explain whether or not you agree with Diana Chang’  s perspective (text-to-self)?
What thoughts and/or connections does the text raise for you about the characters in the book? Is there a
particular character or experience which enables you to make a connection between the two texts (text-to-text)

Sample Solution

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