The Bible provides a wealth of insight into our lives.

Getting Started:

The Bible provides a wealth of insight into our lives. God’s Word provides principles that can shape our worldview toward beneficial behavior. However, the Bible also characterizes mankind as born with a sinful nature. We are told in Romans 8:7 “The sinful mind is hostile to God. It does not submit to God’s law, nor can it do so” (New International Version). Due to mankind’s desire to seek selfish ends in all of life, we tend not to do what is right but only what is in our best interest, or so we think. However, God has a plan. Proverbs 19:21 says, “Many are the plans in a man’s heart, but it is the Lord’s purpose that prevails.” Although the sinful nature of humankind is inherent, God has an eternal design. We, too, need a plan in our oversight of information technology use. God’s Word also reminds us that the goal is to treat our fellow members of society with the same respect we want to enjoy. Matthew 7:12 is commonly referred to as the Golden Rule. Jesus said, “So in everything, do to others what you would have them do to you. For this sums up the Law and the Prophets.”

Instructions:

Review the material in the “Getting Started” section above, and read Romans 8:7, Proverbs 19:21, and Matthew 7:12.
Be sure to address the following prompts in your paper:
In what areas of your professional life could the Golden Rule, Matthew 7:12, apply?
How should this rule be used in developing a governance plan in technology?

Sample Solution

The Concept of Abnormality and the Bible

      While the concept of abnormality may seem simple enough to identify at face value, in reality, it is a complex topic with ambiguous boundaries. Nolen-Hoeksema (2020) describes psychological abnormality as falling on a continuum, with various factors involved in identifying it such as cultural, socioeconomic, age, and more which make an impact on how deviated from the norm a behavior or state of being is. Furthermore, there are four dimensions, known as the four Ds of abnormality which attempt to narrow down what precisely makes a mental state or behavior abnormal. These are: dysfunction, distress, deviance, and dangerousness. Nolan-Hoeskema (2020) indicates that higher levels of the four Ds found in behavior in comparison to culture, age, gender, and more help professionals recognize abnormality in an individual.

Factors and triggers can be biological, social, or psychological in nature and different combinations can form disorders (Nolen-Hoeksema, 2020). Some psychopathological disorders include anxiety, depression, eating disorders, addictions, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), amongst many others. Wielgosz et al (2019) note that practicing mindfulness meditation can have a notable positive impact on psychological abnormalities such as these.

        The Bible often addresses those displaying behavior that is considered abnormal in some fashion, often focusing on sin. From the perspective of the authors of the Bible, however, abnormality is not necessarily permanent. For example, in Mark 2:13-17, Jesus willingly eats and drinks with tax collectors, who were considered to be sinners by societal norms at the time (King James Bible, 1769/2017). He did this with the intent to help them repent and improve their “abnormal” behaviors, as a doctor would tend to the sick. In modern western society, tax collectors are not seen as sinners, despite being perceived as inconvenient, to put it mildly. Jesus teaches that imperfect humans must be looked at as exactly that – imperfect, but with the ability to improve with the help of love and compassion. The Bible also describes how abnormalities rely heavily on culture and time period. It would not be frowned upon today, like it would have been 2,000 years ago in Israel, to eat with someone who is employed to call in debt because that person is perceived as just doing his/her job. In summary, the Bible does address the existence of abnormalities, but it does so with the understanding that abnormalities, for the most part, are reversible or redeemable.

Sample Solution

The vision of worship we find in the Psalms.

INSTRUCTIONS
• Watch Dr. Walter Bruggemann’s three videos (links provided below):

o The Psalms: The Hard Road from Obedience to Praise – Lecture One “Orientation
 https://app.vidgrid.com/view/O1VVQeyxXyUL

o The Psalms: The Hard Road from Obedience to Praise – Lecture Two “Disorientation”
 https://app.vidgrid.com/view/6wDqd8mf06Gx

o The Psalms: The Hard Road from Obedience to Praise – Lecture Three “New Orientation”
 https://app.vidgrid.com/view/vjmgLvfwX4lZ

• Discuss the way that Brueggemann categorizes the Psalms.

  1. Identify and explain the categories of Orientation, Disorientation, and New Orientation.
  2. Why are these helpful categories?
  3. How did the Psalms reflect the life of ancient Israel? Describe the vision of worship we find in the Psalms.

Sample Solution

“Have You No Shame? hour/Shame and Right/Wrong”

read Chapter 5 “Have You No Shame? hour/Shame and Right/Wrong” from Misreading Scripture with Western Eyes by E. Randolph Richards by Graeme Goldsworthy answering the following questions: What did you learn about from the reading? Do you agree or disagree with the author, explain why? What stood out to you most, and why? What was the main idea from the chapter! Please remember to show evidence that you did in fact read the chapter!

Students are to read Chapter 6 “Sand Through the Hourglass: Time” from Misreading Scripture with Western Eyes by E. Randolph Richards by Graeme Goldsworthy answering the following questions: What did you learn about from the reading? Do you agree or disagree with the author, explain why? What stood out to you most, and why? What was the main idea from the chapter! Please remember to show evidence that you did in fact read the chapter!

Students are to read Chapter 7 “First Things First: Rules and Relationships” from Misreading Scripture with Western Eyes by E. Randolph Richards by Graeme Goldsworthy answering the following questions: What did you learn about from the reading? Do you agree or disagree with the author, explain why? What stood out to you most, and why? What was the main idea from the chapter! Please remember to show evidence that you did in fact read the chapter!14px

Students are to read Chapter 9 “It’s All About Me: Finding the Center of God’s Will” from Misreading Scripture with Western Eyes by E. Randolph Richards by Graeme Goldsworthy answering the following questions: What did you learn about from the reading? Do you agree or disagree with the author, explain why? What stood out to you most, and why? What was the main idea from the chapter! Please remember to show evidence that you did in fact read the chapter!

Sample Solution

Evidence that God’s Kingdom had already begun

  1. a) What does Mark focus on as evidence that God’s Kingdom had already begun? Read the passages from Mark that you can find in the Readings. b) When does Mark assure his readers about the ‘eschaton?’ c) What does Mark tell his readers they should expect in this life – as Jesus did – and what reward will be theirs? </code></pre></li>The Gospel of Matthew was directed to Jewish converts. How does Matthew draw parallels between the story of Moses and the evolving story of Jesus? Give four (4) examples between the ministries of Moses and Jesus (be specific). Write a brief description/definition of the Pharisees, Sadducees, Essenes and Zealots. Now, think in contemporary terms. Who would you think in our world, society, politics, hierarchies, would you describe as each one of these groups? (Exp: Sadducees: in our time they might be the pope, Wahhabi Sunni, Mormon leaders) (don't use these examples in your answer) What sense of the future does the original ending of Mark offer the reader of the 1st century ce? ( Mark 16: 1-8) What reason do you think explains the addition of verses 9-20? Why would that ending be unacceptable to later readers in the 2nd century?

Sample Solution

Matthew 5:17-20

Read Matthew 5:17-20 then Galatians 2:15-21 and 3:1-4.

Paul’s radical understanding of the Mosaic Law and the Gospels contrasted with what Jesus was to have said in Matthew. How are they contradictory?

Sample Solution

The Bible has to say about safety.

Background Information

Explore what the Bible has to say about safety. Psalm 122:7 states, “Peace be within your walls and security within your towers” (ESV). The writing of Psalms is generally attributed to King David in ancient Israel. The verse is referring to a city, Jerusalem. This is very clearly indicating a physical threat, possibly a surrounding unfriendly nation or group of people. However, threats may come from a variety of attackers and in many forms. Psalm 9:10 says, “Those who know your name trust in you, for you, Lord, have never forsaken those who seek you” (NIV).

Review the material in the Background Information, including the specific Bible passages.
Be sure to address the following prompts in your paper:
In the context of our world today, and particularly technology, where are today’s threats likely to come from?
Security is “within your towers,” so how can we work to assure that “peace,” or security?
Considering your cultural/religious background, what is your personal view regarding God protecting us humans? Explain your opinion and provide examples if possible.

Sample Solution

EXPLANATION OF THE FLOW OF THOUGHT IN ROMANS 5:12 – 8:37

Paul’s letter to the Romans is perhaps the most logical and systematic of his letters in terms of presentation of a biblical theology, so it requires detailed study. Careful study of Scripture in its context leads to much better results than simply looking for material taken out of context to support a preconceived doctrine. So, the good student of Romans will first analyze Scripture, but always with a view to learning the theological point. An effective way to learn Romans, then, is to select a topic from a list of passages or sections of Romans on which you conduct scholar level research and analysis of the biblical text and then explain the results of the biblical analysis of the passage or section and the theological theme that can be drawn from the passage or section of the letter.

INSTRUCTIONS
The bibliography must consist of at least ten sources, written in current Turabian style, other than the annotation mentioned below. For students unfamiliar with Turabian, the School of Divinity has provided a very helpful guide, including an example paper. Please see the link in the Syllabus and Course Schedule in the Course Overview.
Consult and interact with at least ten published scholarly sources. Only published sources may be used. Unpublished Internet sources are not research level sources. Published material, that is located on library sites, Google Books, etc. are useful. The Holy Bible, dictionaries/lexicons, and concordances must be utilized, but they are not counted in the minimum number of sources. These are simply understood components of research. These types of sources need to be included in the bibliography, but do not count toward the required ten.

Sample Solution