How the Iroquois Creation Story compare and contrast with the Genesis creation story

Reflecting on your reading of Native American literature, address one of the following prompts:

How does the Iroquois Creation Story compare and contrast with the Genesis creation story written by the Hebrews in the Old Testament?
Explain how the Iroquois Creation Story could be scientifically possible.
What elements of Native American literature do find enjoyable? Describe the elements and explain why they appeal to you.

Sample Solution

Longenecker’s four (4) options for moving from the Bible to theology/ethics appeals

The reading this week by Longenecker demonstrated that even after deciding on an interpretive strategy for understanding the biblical text, there still exists a challenge for how you can apply it to contemporary life. Longenecker explores four (4) quite different options and then decides on an eclectic approach, drawing from what he believes to be the best of each.
Explain which of Longenecker’s four (4) options for moving from the Bible to theology/ethics appeals the most to you. Do you agree with his eclectic approach or would you select another of the four options?

Sample Solution

The Lord’s Supper in Luke’s Gospel

Commenting on Luke 22:14-20, Bruce Malina and Richard Rohrbaugh write: “The critical importance of table fellowship as both reality and symbol of social cohesion and shared values cannot be overestimated in this passage (Social-Scientific Commentary on the Synoptic Gospels, 402). Malina and Rohrbaugh say the same of parallel accounts of the Last Supper in Mark 14:17-25 and Matthew 26:20-29, but distinctive features of Luke’s account make the authors’ statement particularly applicable here.

  1. Compare Luke’s account of the Last Supper with Mark’s account. In particular, note how Jesus’ words in Luke 22:24-30 have a parallel in Mark 10:42-44. Luke’s account of Jesus’ journey from Galilee to Jerusalem is substantially longer that that recounted in Mark 10:32-52 where Jesus’ discussion of “greatness” occurs in connection with a third passion prediction and a special request from James and John. Luke does not recount James and John’s request nor Jesus’ response to them (see Powell’s discussion of parts of Mark absent from Luke, 155). Note language in Jesus’ response to James and John (Mark 10:38-40) that evokes images of a meal where a ritualistic expression of solidarity occurs. How might this explain Luke’s location of Jesus’ teaching about genuine greatness? Without an account of the request of James and John, which arouses anger among the disciples, what in Luke’s account of the Last Supper indicates actions or behavior that threaten the solidarity between Jesus and his disciples?
  2. Some interpreters regard Luke 22:24-30 as a precis of Jesus’ teaching that is, a summary of teachings that captures their essence. Noteworthy is how this precis is part of what might be characterized as Jesus’ “farewell address” (see the interpretative note to this passage in NISB). How is 22:24-30 an effective precis, as defined above, for Jesus’ teachings in Luke’s Gospel, particularly the teaching found in the Travel Narrative? How does Jesus’ institution of what comes to be called the Lord’s Supper provide his disciples with direction and strength to care on in his absence?
  3. Consider how what Jesus says to his disciples in Luke’s account of the Last Supper prepares them for their apostolic mission which Luke recounts in the Book of Acts. (Murphy provides a brief overview of Acts at the end of the chapter on Luke.) Contrast the setting of Jesus’ saying about his disciples judging the twelve tribes of Israel in Luke with its setting in Matthew (19:28). How does the inclusion of this Q saying what appears to function as Jesus’ farewell address provides a bridge between the gospel and Acts? Recall the forum in Unit 5 where we discussed how sayings and parables of Jesus in Matthew 24 and 25 intensify the eschatological urgency of Mark’s apocalyptic discourse. Some of these sayings and parables come from the Q source and others are unique to Matthew. Luke records a saying of Jesus that exhorts hearers to be prepared lest the day of judgment come upon them “suddenly like a snare” (21:34). However, it seems that Luke is not as concerned about the nearness of final judgment as are Mark and Matthew? (See the section, “Delay of the Parousia,” in the Murphy textbook, and Powell’s discussion of the present aspects of salvation, pp. 163-165.) Consider how the teachings and parables in Luke’s Travel Narrative focus on manifestations of the kingdom of God in present world that believers encounter daily; note for example: 11:1-8; 13:27-30; 17:20-21. How is “judging the twelve tribes of Israel” related to the disciples’ mission of forming a new type of religious community–a community with Jewish roots where Gentiles experience full inclusion–within the present world order?
  4. In our churches today, does the Lord’s Supper or Holy Communion function as a ritual of solidarity offering direction and empowerment for mission in the manner that Luke describes the Last Supper functioning for Jesus’ disciples? Explain.

Sample Solution

The Lord’s Supper in Luke’s Gospel

Commenting on Luke 22:14-20, Bruce Malina and Richard Rohrbaugh write: “The critical importance of table fellowship as both reality and symbol of social cohesion and shared values cannot be overestimated in this passage (Social-Scientific Commentary on the Synoptic Gospels, 402). Malina and Rohrbaugh say the same of parallel accounts of the Last Supper in Mark 14:17-25 and Matthew 26:20-29, but distinctive features of Luke’s account make the authors’ statement particularly applicable here.

  1. Compare Luke’s account of the Last Supper with Mark’s account. In particular, note how Jesus’ words in Luke 22:24-30 have a parallel in Mark 10:42-44. Luke’s account of Jesus’ journey from Galilee to Jerusalem is substantially longer that that recounted in Mark 10:32-52 where Jesus’ discussion of “greatness” occurs in connection with a third passion prediction and a special request from James and John. Luke does not recount James and John’s request nor Jesus’ response to them (see Powell’s discussion of parts of Mark absent from Luke, 155). Note language in Jesus’ response to James and John (Mark 10:38-40) that evokes images of a meal where a ritualistic expression of solidarity occurs. How might this explain Luke’s location of Jesus’ teaching about genuine greatness? Without an account of the request of James and John, which arouses anger among the disciples, what in Luke’s account of the Last Supper indicates actions or behavior that threaten the solidarity between Jesus and his disciples?
  2. Some interpreters regard Luke 22:24-30 as a precis of Jesus’ teaching that is, a summary of teachings that captures their essence. Noteworthy is how this precis is part of what might be characterized as Jesus’ “farewell address” (see the interpretative note to this passage in NISB). How is 22:24-30 an effective precis, as defined above, for Jesus’ teachings in Luke’s Gospel, particularly the teaching found in the Travel Narrative? How does Jesus’ institution of what comes to be called the Lord’s Supper provide his disciples with direction and strength to care on in his absence?
  3. Consider how what Jesus says to his disciples in Luke’s account of the Last Supper prepares them for their apostolic mission which Luke recounts in the Book of Acts. (Murphy provides a brief overview of Acts at the end of the chapter on Luke.) Contrast the setting of Jesus’ saying about his disciples judging the twelve tribes of Israel in Luke with its setting in Matthew (19:28). How does the inclusion of this Q saying what appears to function as Jesus’ farewell address provides a bridge between the gospel and Acts? Recall the forum in Unit 5 where we discussed how sayings and parables of Jesus in Matthew 24 and 25 intensify the eschatological urgency of Mark’s apocalyptic discourse. Some of these sayings and parables come from the Q source and others are unique to Matthew. Luke records a saying of Jesus that exhorts hearers to be prepared lest the day of judgment come upon them “suddenly like a snare” (21:34). However, it seems that Luke is not as concerned about the nearness of final judgment as are Mark and Matthew? (See the section, “Delay of the Parousia,” in the Murphy textbook, and Powell’s discussion of the present aspects of salvation, pp. 163-165.) Consider how the teachings and parables in Luke’s Travel Narrative focus on manifestations of the kingdom of God in present world that believers encounter daily; note for example: 11:1-8; 13:27-30; 17:20-21. How is “judging the twelve tribes of Israel” related to the disciples’ mission of forming a new type of religious community–a community with Jewish roots where Gentiles experience full inclusion–within the present world order?
  4. In our churches today, does the Lord’s Supper or Holy Communion function as a ritual of solidarity offering direction and empowerment for mission in the manner that Luke describes the Last Supper functioning for Jesus’ disciples? Explain.

Sample Solution

Everyday Bible Study

After reading the assigned chapters in Everyday Bible Study (Chapters 1-5), create a learning log that lists 10 quotes from the assigned reading that highlight either a concept that resonated with you or a concept that represents new learning for you. Following each of these quotes you must provide a 3-5 sentence explanation of how the selected quote represents either what resonated with you or this new learning. For an example of this type of thread, please see the provided example.

Replies: Reply to two threads and address your classmates’ thoughts and ideas. The content of each reply must reflect an excellent knowledge of the reading and interact with both the thread and relevant chapter material. You must support your thoughts and ideas with content from Everyday Bible Study.

Sample Solution

Biblical principles

Provide a practical application of material learned by developing concepts learned in the
presentations. Using these concepts, you will investigate the recent political
history of your congressional district and state, the rise to power and voting
record of your Representative to the United States Congress and one of your
United State Senators. Determine if your representatives keep their
promises when they go to Washington and determine in their voting record aligns
with Biblical principles and your own beliefs.

Sample Solution

Mark’s gospel

Videos to watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nnl9XrSM1Xs
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qP2rLgrBtTI
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ak-riGdz-UM
Questions to answer:

  1. What stands out for you as you reflect on N.T. Wright’s and Robert Barron’s material on ‘belief in God’? Identify at least three of the most important ideas about ‘belief in God’ from Wright, and three from Barron. Discus whether you find these ideas to be plausible or implausible, intriguing, or not, and why you judge them as you do.
  2. If there were aspects of their discussions that made
    think about the topic in a new or unexpected way,
    please describe your reactions.

Module 4:
Videos to watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K6TnI0_Ug4A
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0d24fb3c4Kw

  1. If you’ve never read a gospel, or it’s been a long time since you have read one, what was the experience like? Was it understandable than you expected?
  2. Many contemporary scripture scholars argue that Mark’s gospel in many ways is a radical challenge to the status quo of Mark’s Day (regarding matters of politics, religion, and society). Do you agree or disagree with these scholarly interpretations? How do some of Mark’s major themes (e.g., the Kingdom of God, the meaning of Messiah, the healing stories, attitudes toward political authority and violence, the mission of the Twelve) fit into your assessment? Be specific and cite examples in support of your assessment.
  3. How does the context in which Mark’s gospel was written (its time and place, the situation of Judaism, the Roman Empire, etc.) figure into your sense of how they were understood by their initial audiences?

Sample Solution

Christian’s relationship to the Old Testament

Given the existence of an Old and a New Testament raises the question: What is the Christian’s relationship to the Old Testament? More particularly, what is the Christian’s obligation to the Old Testament Law (laws)? Please begin this discussion by considering what Jesus himself said about the Old Testament. Consider some of Jesus’ most pertinent statements regarding the Law and the Prophets. How did Jesus view his own relationship to the Old Testament? Did Jesus teach that the Old Testament Law was binding for his followers? Offer a solution to this perplexing issue.

Sample Solution

Argument for the book of Romans

Here is your prompt (that is, what
you will see on the day of the exam): You have up to two hours to detail the argument of the book of
Romans. You are to divide your essay into five parts, corresponding to the five main sections of Romans.
highlight Paul’s main intentions and how his argument fits together. You should budget about
20 minutes of writing for each of the five sections (allowing 20 minutes of flexible time).

 

Sample Solution

 

The Gospel According to John

Which material is found in the Synoptic Gospels but not in John, and what are the Johannine equivalents of Synoptic teaching? Why do you think that John includes some materials in his Gospel that are not in the Synoptic Gospels? How do these differences impact our understanding of the historical value of these Gospels?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sample Solution