Humanistic Mathematics)

reflection

Order Description

I want you to write an essay as a final reflection to my whole course. My course is one of the transdisciplinary course called (Humanistic Mathematics).
Please I want you to answer the following questions as an essay
This are the questions that you have to answer as an essay :
In an essay of about 1200 words, please respond to the following questions:
1. What are the three most important ideas you have taken from this course?
2. What was most surprising for you in the course?
3. Was there any specific reading on the syllabus that aroused any strong emotions? Did you disagree or get angry or annoyed at any of the authors we have engaged with? If so why? If you want to comment on multiple texts / authors, then feel free to do so.
4. Did you have any new thoughts about your relationship to mathematics due to some of the work of this course?
5. What went really well for you with respect to this course? (Was there a specific reading that just totally resonated? Was the in-class discussion of one of the course themes enlightening or inspiring for you? Did you find that the different activities in the class worked well together?)

Description:
-This final reflection it should be based on the reflections that I did each week during this semester. Beside MOOC reflection which is (EDUC115-S How to Learn Math: For Students) offered through Stanford’s edX platform. This MOOC is a video lectures that I watched and then I wrote a reflection for each lectures. Please, sum up all my reflections and my thought. and use that to write the essay.
Furthermore, In each reflection assignments that I did. The instructor asked us to answer some questions which are similar each week based on what she wanted us to read on that week.
This is an example of the questions:
PLEASE ATTEMPT THESE AFTER CLASS AND AFTER COMPLETING THIS WEEK’S READING.
please respond as clearly and specifically as possible to the following questions:
1. Write down brief synopses of each of the readings from this week.
2. What are the three most important ideas you have taken from this week’s class meeting?
3. What was most surprising for you in this week’s reading?
4. Was there any specific reading from this week that aroused any strong emotions? Did you disagree or get angry or annoyed at any of the authors we have engaged with this week? If so why?
5. Did you have any new thoughts about your relationship to mathematics due to some of the work of this week?
6. What went really well this week with respect to this course? (Was there a specific reading that just totally resonated? Was the in-class discussion of one of the course themes enlightening or inspiring for you? Did you find that the different activities in the class worked well together?)
7. Do you have any suggestions for the instructor? If she were to teach this course again, what could be done better this week that would help the students engage more with the world of humanistic mathematics?

Also, for the MOOC she asked us to answered the following question:
PLEASE ATTEMPT ONLY AFTER YOU HAVE ALREADY COMPLETED WEEK 1 OF THE MOOC: How to Learn Math: For Students. This means that you have watched the videos and have attempted to answer all the questions in the week’s session.
please respond as clearly and specifically as possible to the following questions:
1. Write down brief synopses of each of the videos from this week.
2. What are the three most important ideas you have taken from this week’s videos overall?
3. What was most surprising for you in this week’s session?
4. Did you have any new thoughts about your relationship to mathematics due to some of the work of this week?
5. Have you found the MOOC environment workable? Did you have any problems this week?
Here is the description of the course:
Course Description As a scholarly stance, humanistic mathematics describes an approach to mathematics that views it as a human endeavor and focuses on its aesthetic, cultural, historical, literary, pedagogical, philosophical, psychological, and sociological aspects. As a pedagogical framework, humanistic mathematics explores and builds on the relationship of mathematics with its nontraditional partners in the humanities, the fine arts, and social sciences, providing additional perspective for the role of mathematics in a liberal arts education. This course exposes participants to both facets of humanistic mathematics. As such, it may be of special relevance to students in education and mathematics, but all interested are welcome and will have much to contribute.
Books that I read during this semester:
1. Marcia Ascher: Ethnomathematics: A Multicultural View of Mathematical Ideas.
2. Berlinghoff and Gouvea: Math Through the Ages: A Gentle History for Teachers and Others, Expanded Edition. (MTA).
3. Jo Boaler: What’s Math Got to Do with It? How Parents and Teachers Can Help Children Learn to Love Their Least Favorite Subject. (WMG).
4. William Byers: How Mathematicians Think: Using Ambiguity, Contradiction, and Paradox to Create Mathematics. (HMT).
5. Eric Gutstein: Reading And Writing The World With Mathematics: Toward a Pedagogy for Social Justice. (RWW).
Students will be expected to enroll in and complete a free MOOC (EDUC115-S How to Learn Math: For Students) offered through Stanford’s edX platform; this course can be accessed at https://class.stanford.edu/courses/Education/EDUC115-S/Spring2014/about. This MOOC complements some of the ideas of our course and will be an integral part of our discussions. The time commitment for the MOOC is minimal; there are six modules and each module involves watching videos that run less than 25 minutes each, so engaging with the online platform for this component will take less than three hours of your time for the whole semester.

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