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International Trade Summary

Promoting international trade is not a zero-sum game. It is a win-win proposition; both parties gain from trade.

Consider the following:

Tariffs are paid by the citizens of the country imposing tariffs, not by the citizens of the country producing the products upon which the tariffs are levied.
The term “trade deficits” is a misnomer. Every country’s trade is always in balance.
Trade deficits do not mean the US no longer produces anything to export. The US is the world’s second largest manufacturer and the world’s second largest exporter of manufactured goods.
Trade deficits reflect a strong economy. Trade deficits rise during economic expansions and fall during economic contractions. Unemployment falls as trade deficits rise and rises as trade deficits fall.
Imports and exports are complements, not competitors. Both are necessary and both contribute to economic growth.
Roughly one-third of all US imports and exports is trade between US multinational companies and their overseas subsidiaries.
Foreign-owned companies operating in the US number in the thousands and provide directly or indirectly jobs for more than 13 million US workers (roughly, 10% of the US workforce).
US trade deficit in goods in 2018 (as a % of GDP) was the same as it was 5, 10 and 15 years earlier.
The rise in US goods trade deficit with China has not increased the US total goods trade deficit. It has been offset by reduced goods imports from other trading partners.
There is a strong correlation between the rise in world trade and:
The rise in world GDP
The dramatic fall in the world’s extreme poverty rate
The rise in world life expectancy
For every US manufacturing job lost to trade between 2000 and 2010, seven US jobs were lost to domestic productivity improvements. Those seven jobs cannot be brought back from overseas because they never left the US.
Write a 700- to 1,050-word evaluation of credible economists’ unbiased opinions on the benefits, costs, and results of current US trade and tariff policies. Complete the following in your evaluation:

Evaluate how US trade policy changes in the last 2 years affect global trade activities by multinational corporations.
Discuss credible economists’ opinions on the long-term effects of trade and tariff policies changes in the last 2 years.
Explain the effect of recent changes to trade and tariff policies have had on your employer, you, or someone you know.

Sample Solution

ecause it is a loved thing. It is a loved thing because people love it. Quickly, ‘holy’ or ‘good’ can become detached from ‘god-loved’. If ‘god-loved’ (or ‘god- willed’) were to mean exactly the same thing as ‘good’ then it would follow that if God wills something because it is good, then He must also will it because it is god-willed. Yet, as we’ve established that second statement is incongruous with the other types of action we’ve discussed (carrying seeing, etc.). By contrast, if what’s god-willed is merely god-willed because God wills it, then what’s good should also be good merely because god wills it. This second statement, again, seems out of touch with our common intuitions. Hence we arrive at the titular problem, ‘Is something good because God wills it, or does He will it because it is good?’. There are defendants of both possibilities and this essay will demonstrate the problems of each. The first horn, that something is good because God wills it, is open to a number of objections. First, there is the ‘anything goes’ argument. That is, if God so wills it, anything can become good. Torture is the classic example. If overnight God decided so, then conceivably torture could be decreed as good and thus encouraged. In fact, it could become morally wrong for us to do anything but go around torturing strangers. Such a possibility seems heavily counterintuitive. A theist might naturally say that God would never do such a thing, yet, simply the unlikelihood of such a state of affairs materialising seems a fairly unconvincing retort. Of course, one could point to an omnipotent God as responsible for those intuitions and accordingly, we could assume that were he to take such a course of action he must be doing it for some higher purpose beyond our comprehension. It’s important to note here that God’s benevolence and omniscience must be our motives for following him. As Williams notes, “if it is his power, or the mere fact that he created us, analogies with human kings or fathers […] leave us with the recognition that there are many kings and fathers who ought not to be obeyed”3 (Morality – An Introduction to Ethics, B. Williams, Chapter 8, p. 63). Indeed, an all-powerful ruler who created everything is not necessarily more worthy of obedience but simply harder to disobey. This benevolence, stemming from God’s omniscience, presents a pitfall for the first hornist. For, while God’s willing of acts making them moral maintains his omnipotence, it removes the sense of compassion, care and love that God has thus limiting him in another way. If whatever is willed is good, then God’s goodness is determined by his own submission to his will. However, this undermines the good of God himself, his nature. Having a will that arbitrarily legislates things as universally good seems more like the profile of a tyrant rather than a
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